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The 43 persons constituting the Grateful Dead’s European tour apportioned themselves for the most part between two buses which came to be known as the Bolo bus and the Bozo bus. The Bolo bus had a john in it and its seats faced forward. The Bozo bus had a refrigerator and some of its seats were installed facing back, to accommodate four tables. And to look back. The subtle difference in character and import and atmosphere between the two omnibuses was so profoundly hidden and enigmatic that you could never possibly understand it. The Bozos wore masks, and the Bolos showed their faces. At one time the Bozos staged a raid on the Bolo provisions; at one time the Bolos staged a raid on the Bozo provisions.

One St. Dilbert defected from the Bozos and lived for a season with the Bolos. In view of his subsequent martyrdom, his penitence and reconciliation with the Bozos, it came to be said that he was a true hypnocratic missionary to Bololand. And to look back, it appears evident that Bozo and Bolo knew themselves each the other’s raison d’etre. Is hypnocracy not the aspiration to know what it is?
– Choirmaster

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On the left side, there’s Tim Hovey, Bobby & Frankie Weir, Billy & Susila Kreutzmann, Bob Matthews & Betty Cantor, and 2 unknown people in the back. On the other side of the aisle is John “Marmaduke” Dawson (?), behind him is Spencer Dryden from the New Riders of the Purple Sage, Phil Lesh & Rosie McGee, David Parker, and a barely visible Ben Haller.
-Jerilyn

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Talking across the aisle on the left is Ramrod, unknown crew (maybe a truck driver) behind him and Steve Parish leaning against the window. Across the aisle in the back is John Hagen pointing in the air and Joe Winslow leaning against the window. I don’t recognize the person Ramrod is talking to.
-Jerilyn

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Frankie Weir, looking out from the bus, from the right is, Rock Scully, Pigpen, Joe Winslow (behind Pigpen’s arm), Rex Jackson, & Sonny Heard (with glasses)

Digital Remix New Content (not seen in printed book)

EUROPE ‘72

Grateful Dead
Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann, Ron (Pigpen) McKernan, Keith Godchaux, Robert Hunter (songwriter)

Equipment Crew
Lawrence (Ramrod) Shurtliff, Rex Jackson, Sonny Heard, Joe Winslow, Steve Parish, Mark (Sparky) Razine, Dan Healy, Bill (Kidd) Candelario

Sound Crew
Alembic Studios: Bob Matthews, Jim Furman, Betty Cantor-Jackson, Rosie McGee, Dennis (Wizard)
Leonard

Stage Lights
Candace Brightman, Ben Haller

Management
Jon McIntire, Sam Cutler, Rock Scully, David Parker, Alan Trist

Tour Manager
Sam Cutler

Office
Bonnie Parker, Dale Franklin, Annette Flowers

Carolyn (Mountain Girl) Garcia, Sue Swanson, Christie Bourne, Frankie Hart, Susila Kreutzmann, Donna Jean Godchaux, Francis Shurtliff, Mary Anne Meyer ….

John (Marmaduke) Dawson, David Nelson, Spencer Dryden (NRPS were also gigging in Europe for some of the tour) …..
EUROPE ‘72

Grateful Dead
Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann, Ron (Pigpen) McKernan, Keith Godchaux, Robert Hunter (songwriter)

Equipment Crew
Lawrence (Ramrod) Shurtliff, Rex Jackson, Sonny Heard, Joe Winslow, Steve Parish, Mark (Sparky) Razine, Dan Healy, Bill (Kidd) Candelario

Sound Crew
Alembic Studios: Bob Matthews, Jim Furman, Betty Cantor-Jackson, Rosie McGee, Dennis (Wizard)
Leonard

Stage Lights
Candace Brightman, Ben Haller

Management
Jon McIntire, Sam Cutler, Rock Scully, David Parker, Alan Trist

Tour Manager
Sam Cutler

Office
Bonnie Parker, Dale Franklin, Annette Flowers

Carolyn (Mountain Girl) Garcia, Sue Swanson, Christie Bourne, Frankie Hart, Susila Kreutzmann, Donna Jean Godchaux, Francis Shurtliff, Mary Anne Meyer ….

John (Marmaduke) Dawson, David Nelson, Spencer Dryden (NRPS were also gigging in Europe for some of the tour) …..

ON THE OMNIBUSES
“In the ocean of hypnocracy the shore is just another wave.” – Robert Hunter

Hypnocracy was born in Europe, 1972, on a tour which began on April 1, the Feast of Fools. The Choirmaster said, “Is not hypnocracy the aspiration to know what it is?” Except for this bud of wisdom, little is known about the philosophy except that it originated with the Bozos and Bolos (aka the Grateful Dead & family) on their Grand Tour in two omnibuses, and that Dilbert was their patron saint. Mostly I rode the Bozo bus. I had an interesting run-in with St. Dilbert, normally a Bolo. He accused me of not carrying my weight and set me to breaking down the setup after the Tivoli Gardens gig in Copenhagen. My job was to wheel road cases from the stage to the equipment truck and almost immediately one catapulted over a loose cable and sundry items piled on top spilled across the parquet in a clatter. Eloquent silence and devastating glares from the crew.

To be fair, the Saint was forgiving. Perhaps he knew that my main job had been PR advancing of the tour and to that end I had visited Warner Bros local offices and prepped the underground press across Europe for the coming odyssey. I attempted to land a weird gig in a Dutch castle. But tour manager Sam Cutler nixed that one. Rats in the dungeons.

Paris, the City of Light, was a high point. On a day off, the record label had invited all 40 of us to a multi-course dinner at La Grand Cascade restaurant in the Bois de Boulogne. Before the tour, elaborate Nudie suits had been tailored for some. The band hardly wore them, preferring Bozo masks, but manager Jon McIntire and Alembic sound engineer Bob Matthews hosted the feast in theirs and for a while confusion of tongues was leavened by mirth of costume and other exchanges. The tour was unique in its own expression of West Coast ‘tribal’ culture but, in the tradition of the caravan and bus adventures of the Merry Pranksters and Hog Farmers, it was a community felt as ‘family’, working to raise consciousness through art and cultural expression, and having a lot of fun doing it. The Grateful Dead’s reputation as exemplars of the musical side of this wider enterprise preceded them. And it was fun, with their friends, wives, children, fellow travelers, crew and office, new friends and colleagues bonding in pursuit of good music shows while rumbling around Europe for two months soaking up heritages.

Back in London, the band played for a week at the Lyceum, a multi-balconied venue in the Strand, heart of the theatre district, the kind of time-in-one-place concert run that can move things magically. In the course of that, Garcia, Matthews and I went down to a studio in Soho to mix a track from the earlier Wembley Stadium concerts. On the way we wove through old pedestrian alleyways, and stopped for a browse at Watkins ‘earth mysteries’ bookstore. With d/b/a’s suggestive of the times, John Coleman of Revelation Enterprises was producing an album to benefit the empty coffers of Solstice Capers, the organizers of the previous year’s inaugural Glastonbury Fair. We were on our way with a contribution from the Dead, which came about this way:

The year before, a visionary Englishman, Andrew Kerr, had put forward the idea that a festival in the heart of South West England’s megalithic countryside would be attractive to the band, themselves masters of the festival concert and interested in the power of place to enhance their music. They couldn’t make it in 1971, but now they agreed to donate a 24 minute Dark Star as part of a commemorative album to help the Fair continue. Legendary bands of the times like Hawkwind also donated tracks, as did Pete Townsend and others supportive of the Earth celebration movement. The Glastonbury Fair thrives to this day. Later, in 1981, Phil Lesh and I visited the site and examined the pyramid stage built on the line from Stonehenge to Glastonbury Tor, and scaled to some fraction of the Great Pyramid, itself a model of the Earth. We walked amongst the immense oaks of the old landscape and had dinner with the farmer on whose land the Fair takes place. With the adventure of Egypt ’78 not long behind us, we reflected on the symbolism of events and the power of intentions set a decade before. You might say the Dead’s relationship with Glastonbury was fortuitous, or felicitous, or even F sharp, but let’s call it hypnocratic.

It is said that Bozos and Bolos raided each other’s provisions, and that there exist unprinted and unexpurgated editions of the sometimes-daily newsletter and schedule, the Bozo & Bolo Times, which described their feuds and exploits, but I don’t believe any of it. As the Choirmaster said, “Bozo and Bolo knew themselves each the other’s raison d’etre.” Hypnocracy lives on. Just ask Saint Misbehavin’, but that’s another story. – Alan Trist

Photos: Top to bottom – Mary Ann Mayer, Mark Raizene, Mary Anne Mayer